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Tuesday, February 20, 2018


As slang terms for drugs of all types tend to vary across geographical areas, I always tell the clinicians I supervise not to use them. If the therapist calls it "jazz cabbage," and the patient rolls on the floor laughing at them trying to "be cool," a loss of therapeutic credibility occurs.

I like Lisa Withrow's comment above. As one of the authors of the original article and a theoretical semanticist, I am very much aware of what the use of a particular word implies about the speaker's social identification.
The research team has attempted to do regional dialect analyses of these terms, but the data doesn't really lend itself to that kind of analysis. As we use different forums and methods for analyzing social media communications, we hope to refine the outcomes to be of greater utility to interested parties.

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