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Wednesday, April 08, 2009

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As with everything - there is good and bad involved, but the issue seems to always revolve around the fact that "the devil is in the details".

This is a very timely topic for discussion. I recently listened to a story about students illegally using cognitive enhancing drugs on NPR's "Morning Addition." You can read more about it here:
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=100254163

All drugs have unwanted side effects, some of which don't show up until many years later. The question for me is, is the relatively short term benefit of these pharmaceuticals worth it, given that it may cause me greater health problems down the road, some of which may not be known at this time?

The dearth of research on the long term effects of pharmaceuticals is coupled with the business-driven desire to get potentially profitable drugs to market as soon as possible. Impossible, then, to conduct impartial research into the efficacy and *safety* of these drugs over the long haul.

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